Keepstream: A tool for curating internet content

Keepstream is a tool that allows you to curate internet content.

The technology (or what are my powers?)

You can sign up with Keepstream via your Twitter account and you’ll automatically be able to access your Twitter stream and Facebook news, but Keepstream allows you to curate more than social media content. By adding the “Keep It” bookmarklet to your toolbar, you can add web content to your source collections.  You access the bookmarklet by clicking on the “edit your profile” icon which brings up the “Change your settings” screen and a link to the bookmarklet as shown below.

Using the bookmarklet you can add web pages, videos, and even images (e.g., via Flickr or Google Images) to the items you curate, in addition to Tweets and other social media content.

When you’re ready to publish your collection, you have a number of sharing options. You also can embed your Keepstream on your blog.

An overview video of how Keepstream works is shown below.

To keep up with new developments on Keepstream check out the Keepstream blog.

Instructional strategies

Although envisioned as a marketing tool, Keepstream can be used as an instructional tool as well. A curator of digital data is a collector, but the act of collection is not a passive one. It involves a number of digital literacy skills:

  • research
  • evaluation
  • interpretation and reflection
  • storytelling (through the organization of curated content)

An example of a curated collection I created on Health Literacy and Seniors is here.

For a similar platform, you might also want to check out Storify. While the output is similar, the interface has a different feel, though I honestly can’t say I have a preference at this point. It will be interesting to see how both tools develop.

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2 responses to “Keepstream: A tool for curating internet content

  1. Pingback: Using bit.ly bundles to create a learning module | Instructional Design Fusions

  2. Pingback: Social Media Curation needs differ in Response and Recovery Phases of a Disaster « think disaster: a blog by Scott Reuter

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