A new PINOT group on optimizing cross-functional teams

PINOT is a Ning group started by Dr. Allison Rossett and Dr. Rebecca Vaughan Frazee. PINOT stands for Performance Improvement Non-Training Solutions, so the site is all about pretty much everything that supports performance improvement except training.

My colleagues (Erika Romanesko, B.J. Haddad, and Bobby McCon) and I just started a  group on PINOT called “Harmonious Cross-Functional Teams.

Why a focus on cross-functional teams?

All teams have performance challenges, but cross-functional teams are symbolic of the shift from a command-and-control style of organizational structure to the matrix model you’ll increasingly find at many organizations. Cross-functional teams include members who report to different managers. These team members can have significantly different approaches and perspectives, shaped by the unique communities of practice to which they belong. Cross-functional teams are analogous to a band (or orchestra, if you prefer), where individuals play different instruments. They must work together to create harmony. These types of teams can differ in how formalized their leadership structure is. Sometimes there’s a defined leader dictated by an organizational position (think maestro), but sometimes the structure’s much looser and leaders spring up as the occasion demands (like the leader of a rock band—it’s not always the guitarist).

Drawing on different perspectives

In developing our group, we considered that our audience would have different needs based on their unique perspectives. With this in mind,  we structured our site to provided resources and discussion opportunities tied to three different points of view:

You’ll find discussion postings organized by these general categories. So please join in and add your own. But don’t feel limited by the categories—there are many aspects of cross-functional team performance and workplace learning that need to be explored. For example, we’ve added a post on ice breakers and the more horrifying team building activities we’ve seen. We’re also asking people to weigh in on their favorite tools for team work and collaboration. Every month, we’ll showcase the top tools selected by readers and highlight them in our Web 2.0 tools for teams page.

And speaking of pages…

In addition to discussion forums we invite people to join, we’ve provided resources on our group’s pages you may find useful.

These include:

We invite you to help us build these resource collections. See anything missing?  Add a comment. We’d love to hear from you.

 Connecting to a larger community

We built this site to serve a larger audience than our little group, so we hope you’ll join and share your wisdom, experiences, and stories. The site’s only a few days old so we’ll be adding posts and resources. In creating the site, we conducted a review of the literature, tapped into our own experiences, and connected to others in our own personal learning networks. But of course the whole point of building a group like this is to expand our learning networks. And although you may be experiencing social network fatigue, we hope you join us, because:

  1. Odds are you won’t find another group quite like this
  2. We’re a friendly sort
  3. Whether you’re in a corporation, a non-profit, or even in education, you’ve probably experienced both the rewards and challenges of working in a cross-functional team—You have something to say, and we’d like to hear it.

A roundup of postings

These are some of the topics you’ll find in our discussion forum.

Join our group and start your own discussions! Help us discover best practices and work on solving challenges relating to cross-functional teams.

To learn more about PINOT visit the Welcome Center and browse the site. There’s something for everyone interested in non-training solutions to workplace challenges or looking to complement their training efforts.

One response to “A new PINOT group on optimizing cross-functional teams

  1. Pingback: What’s your team member style? | Instructional Design Fusions

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